Saturday, March 5, 2011

The Workshop

I just got back from my first ever trimming workshop and I am so excited to trim my next horse!

The one day workshop was really good. Aimed at the horse enthusiast with little to no prior hoof knowledge, I was expecting not to get too much out of it. I am so glad I went, as although I already had that prior knowledge and a lot of what they spoke about I knew/understood, I still learned so much. I am definitely going to their advanced workshop, and then depending on whether I like that workshop, I will probably go ahead and fork out the money (and time) to do the Diploma in Equine Podiotherapy.

From my notes (in no particular order. I was rough on my booklet and it became unbound. On my way out I dropped it and the pages got all mixed up. Grr):

Blood in hoof = 300-400 times more than what the hoof actually requires for nutrition - energy transference/protection from concussion.
 
Ringbone caused by toe first landing - pedal bone and P2 connect at landing. Bad.
 
Heel first landing = knee straight before hoof hits the ground. Toe first landing = knee bent as hoof hits ground.

Outline of the sole is the outline of the pedal bone - follow sole template!

Base width of wall from the width close to the heel.

Outer wall non-weight bearing, quarters non-weight bearing.

Hard ground - little or no wall height. Soft ground - need extra wall for grip.

Be conservative with heel height! (This is something I have been too aggressive with in the past.)

Hairline viewed from front - parallel to ground = joints all the way up the leg also parallel.

Hoof wall same height all the way around.

Proprioception - Spatial awareness (a term I had not read about before today).

Pressure in hoof pushed blood into all nooks and crannies therefore feeding the small structures.

Laminar line = white line.


Underlined or starred in the booklet:

"... test the hay quality myself by simply soaking it for 4 hrs. If the hay is not high in NSC [non structural carbohydrate] the water generally will not be discoloured or taste sweet."

"Another high fibre low NSC feed I have used is Speedibeet". Possibly for Gracie?


"The gravel I am talking about is natural river or creek gravel rounded by natural water erosion not crushed rock which can be sharp and pierce the sole." (Regarding putting rocks in the paddock to help with the feet).


So... I have some (crappy iPhone) pics of my cadaver trim - don't scroll down if you don't want to see! (No blood and gore, promise...).

I forgot to take before pics!!
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It was a hind foot.




The only thing I should have been more conservative with was heel height, which was a hair shorter than the frog.

It is incredibly hard to get good hoof pics when there is no horse attached to the leg!

Go ahead, laugh at my sparkly red nails...

Bit blurry, but shows the quarter scoop.







This was the table with all the interesting bits!


A hoof/leg cut in half - you can see the digital cushion at the back there, P3, navicular bone, the deep digital flexor tendon, etc.

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